Who and What Was Hot in Scientific Research in 2012

June 2013

The Higgs research and those dedicated to the discovery of the long sought after Higgs particle weren't the only ones to take center stage in 2012.

Find out about the hottest papers and researchers of 2012. Drawn on data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge.

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THE HOTTEST SCIENTIFIC RESEARCHERS OF 2012

Andrew FutrealDr. Andrew Futreal aims to accelerate the translation of genomic technologies into therapeutic applications.

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His chief scientific accomplishments include the identification of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, leading a pioneering effort in large-scale systematic cancer genomics and the identification the BRAF mutations in melanoma, ERBB2 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer and multiple new cancer genes in renal cell carcinoma. He has published over 182 papers in peer-reviewed journals.

Dr. Futreal applies his knowledge of cancer genomics to improve both short-term and long-term patient outcomes extending to cancer survivorship. He is a platform leader for genomics and informatics for the Moonshot initiative.

Eric LanderEric Lander is the President and Founding Director of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. Dr. Lander was...

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... one of the principal leaders of the Human Genome Project, directing the largest center in the international project. He has developed many of the key concepts, tools and information resources in modern genomics, propelling a revolution in our understanding of inherited disease and cancer, genetic regulation and evolution. The recipient of numerous awards, he was elected a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine.

Dr. Lander was appointed by President Obama to co-chair the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, which advises the White House on matters including health, advanced manufacturing, energy policy, information technology, nanotechnology and national security. Dr. Lander earned his BA from Princeton (1978) and his PhD from Oxford (1981) as a Rhodes Scholar. He teaches on the faculty of MIT and the Harvard Medical School.

Frederik KrebsFrederik C. Krebs is currently professor at the Technical University (DTU) of Denmark with research focus on...

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... all aspects of OPV ranging from synthesis of new materials and their stability through advanced device structures such as tandem polymer solar cells, roll-to-roll processing, large scale manufacture, product integration, lifecycle analysis, recycling, installation and operation, to energy production from solar parks based on polymer solar cells. Other interests include all foil based energy systems such as printed thermoelectrics, high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, batteries, resource extraction membranes, water purification systems, printed photocatalysts and printed light emitting devices.

Goncalo AbecasisGonçalo Abecasis is the Felix Moore Collegiate Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan School...

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... of Public Health, where he has been a faculty member since 2001. He has a Ph.D. in Human Genetics from the University of Oxford, where he worked with William Cookson and Lon Cardon.

Dr. Abecasis' research focuses on the development of statistical tools and computational methods that enable studies of genetic variation and its connections to human disease. Software and algorithms developed by Dr. Abecasis are used in human genetic studies around the world. He has made important contributions to our understanding of patterns of genetic variation across the genome, its relationship to a variety of complex traits and diseases, and developed algorithms that enable analysis of large challenging datasets. He is currently deploying next-generation sequencing technologies to study the genomes of thousands of individuals.

Gregory Y.H. LipProfessor Lip, MD, is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.

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He leads a large, multidisciplinary research group (including clinical and laboratory-based components) at the Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham. He is also Visiting Professor of Haemostasis Thrombosis and Vascular Sciences in the School of Life & Health Sciences at the University of Aston in Birmingham, England.

Half of his time is spent as a clinical cardiologist, where he practices the full range of cardiovascular medicine, including outpatient clinics, with large atrial fibrillation (AF) and hypertension specialist clinics, and coronary care unit duties.

Professor Lip has a major interest in the epidemiology of AF and has been researching stroke and bleeding risk factors, and improvements in clinical risk stratification. The CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores — for assessing stroke and bleeding risk, respectively — were first proposed and independently validated following his research, and are now incorporated into international guidelines.

Hui-ming ChengHui-Ming Cheng is Professor and Head of the Advanced Carbon Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, and Deputy...

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... Director for the Institute for Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He is also the 2010 recipient of the Charles E. Pettinos Award, an international triennial recognition of an individual for recent outstanding research accomplishments in the field of carbon science and technology.

Professor Cheng has contributed much to the progress of carbon nanotubes, carbon materials for energy storage, and graphene materials. He has published hundreds of scientific papers and has been awarded numerous patents. Dr. Cheng received his B.T. in Carbon Materials from Hunan University, China, and his M.S. and Ph. D in Materials Science from The Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Jeffrey SosmanDr. Sosman leads the Vanderbilt Melanoma Program and is Co-Leader of the Cell Proliferation and Signal Transduction Program of...

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... the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. He has been an active and well-recognized clinical investigator vested in the therapy of melanoma. He directed numerous clinical trials studying non-chemotherapy based treatment of cancer.

At Vanderbilt, Dr. Sosman directs one of the first programs in the nation to offer melanoma patients' routine genotyping of their tumors to help identify and treat based on their genetic mutations. He has been a very active researcher, while still providing outstanding clinical care as a physician; putting him among a small group of individuals who can drive science developments in this field into treatments potentially impacting patient care. More recently his efforts have turned to personalized therapy of melanoma with well-defined targets (BRAFv600, NRAS mutations, CKIT mutations). He was awarded an Ingram Chair for Cancer Research and has been named the first Mary Hendrickson-Johnson ACS Melanoma Professor for his commitment and effort to bring translational medicine to melanoma therapy.

Jianguo YuJiaguo Yu received his B.S. and M.S. from Huazhong Normal University and Xi'an Jiaotong University, respectively, and his Ph.D. from Wuhan...

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... University of Technology. In 2000, he became Professor of Wuhan University of Technology. His research interests include photocatalysis and photocatalytic hydrogen production. He published more than 280 SCI papers cited over 14,000 times.

Jun WangJun Wang is the Executive Director of BGI (previously known as the Beijing Genomics Institute). He was instrumental in the 1999...

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... founding and growth of the BGI Bioinformatics Department, which is now widely recognized as one of the world's premier research facilities committed to excellence in genome sciences. He has authored 200+ peer-reviewed original papers.

Jun has been recognized with an award from His Royal Highness Prince Foundation in Denmark, Nature's 10 — the year in Science (2012); an Outstanding Science and Technology Achievement from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Top 10 Scientific Achievements in China; and the prize for Important Innovation and Contribution from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research focuses on genomics and related bioinformatics analysis of complex diseases and agricultural crops, with the goal of developing applications using the genomic information.

Kari StefanssonKári Stefánsson, M.D., Dr. Med. served as President, Chief Executive Officer and a Director from the time he...

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... founded deCODE genetics in August 1996 until December of 2012. Dr. Stefánsson was appointed the Chairman of the Board of Directors of deCODE genetics in December 1999. Since Amgen acquired deCODE in December of 2012, Dr. Stefánsson has served as president of deCODE genetics. From 1993 until April 1997, Dr. Stefánsson was a professor of Neurology, Neuropathology and Neuroscience at Harvard University. From 1983 to 1993, he held faculty positions in Neurology, Neuropathology and Neurosciences at the University of Chicago.

Dr. Stefánsson received his M.D. and Dr. Med. from the University of Iceland and is board-certified in neurology and neuropathology in the United States. Through his work with the Icelandic population, he has led the world in the use of big data research methods in human genetics. Dr. Stefánsson was chosen by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential men of the year for 2007 and by Newsweek as one of the 10 most important biologists of the 21 century. He was the recipient of the Jakobus Award 2007, The World Glaucoma Association Award for present scientific impact 2007, The European Society of Human Genetics Award 2009, and The Andre Jahre Award 2009.

Lars WallentinLars Wallentin is senior professor of Cardiology and head of the Uppsala Clinical Research Centre (UCR) at Uppsala University Hospital,...

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... Uppsala, Sweden. Professor Wallentin has been President of the Swedish Cardiac Society and the Swedish Heart Association. His research group has developed many new concepts concerning pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk stratification and antithrombotic and interventional treatments in acute coronary artery disease and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Professor Wallentin has published more than 400 papers in peer- reviewed international journals and has received several prestigious research awards.

Richard WilsonDr. Wilson is an expert in molecular genetics and large-scale DNA sequence analysis, and his laboratory at the Washington University...

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... School of Medicine is among the world's leaders in genome analysis. They have sequenced and analyzed billions of
bases of DNA from the genomes of bacteria, yeast, roundworms, plants, vertebrates, primates and humans. Dr. Wilson's
laboratory was the first to sequence the genome of a cancer patient and discover genetic signatures relevant to the pathogenesis of
the disease. Building upon this achievement, their current focus is to utilize genome sequencing and analysis technology to
discover clues that will facilitate more effective diagnosis and treatment of cancer and other human diseases.

Dr. Wilson is Professor of Genetics, Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Research Member at the Siteman Cancer Center,
where he is also a member of the Senior Leadership Committee. Dr. Wilson received his A.B. degree from Miami University in Ohio
(Microbiology, 1981), his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma (Chemistry and Biochemistry, 1986) and was a Research Fellow in
the Division of Biology at the California Institute of Technology.

Rodney RuoffRodney Ruoff joined The University of Texas at Austin as a Cockrell Family Regents endowed chair in September, 2007.

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He earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from the University of Illinois-Urbana in 1988, and was a Fulbright Fellow in 1988-89 at the Max Planck Institute fuer Stroemungsforschung in Goettingen, Germany. Prior to joining UT-Austin, he was the John Evans Professor of Nanoengineering in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Northwestern University and director of NU's Biologically Inspired Materials Institute from 2002-2007. He has authored or co-authored 347 peer-reviewed publications devoted to chemistry, physics, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biomedical science, and is a Fellow of the Materials Research Society, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Salim YusufSalim Yusuf, D.Phil, FRCPC is a Professor of Medicine at McMaster University, Director of the Population Health Research Institute, and is...

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... Vice President of Research at Hamilton Health Sciences. He has led over 25 major trials and several of them have changed medical practice. He has published over 600 articles, and his research collaboration involves 85 countries in all the inhabited continents of the world. His commitment to prevention of CVD globally was recognized when he was recently elected as the next President-elect of the World Heart Federation.

Yongfang LiDr. Yongfang Li is a professor at the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ICCAS) since 1993. He obtained his Ph.D. degree...

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... in physical chemistry in 1986 from Fudan University and then went to ICCAS as a postdoctoral fellow working on conducting polymers with Professor Renyuan Qian in 1986 - 1988. He did visiting research in Professor Hiroo Inokuchi's laboratory at the Institute for Molecular Science and in Professor Alan J. Geeger's laboratory in UCSB.

His present research interests are polymer solar cells and related photovoltaic materials, including conjugated polymer donor, solution processable organic molecule donor, and fullereent derivative acceptor materials.

Zidon WangZidong Wang is a Professor of Dynamical Systems and Computing at Brunel University in the United Kingdom. Professor Wang's...

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... research interests include dynamical systems, signal processing, bioinformatics, control theory and applications. He has published 270 papers in refereed international journals that have received more than 8,000 journal citations. He is a holder of the Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship of Germany, the JSPS Research Fellowship of Japan, and William Mong Visiting Research Fellowship of Hong Kong.

Professor Wang serves as an Associate Editor for 11 international journals and is a Senior Member of the IEEE, a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and a member of program committees for many international conferences.

Li DingDr. Li Ding joined the Genome Institute at Washington University in 2002. Dr. Ding has extensive experience in cancer genetics/genomics.

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She successfully led and completed the integrated analysis of a multi-institute study on the genomics of lung adenocarcinomas and identified key genes and pathways leading to lung cancer. In addition, Dr. Ding worked with Drs. Ley, Wilson, and Mardis to analyze the tumor and skin genomes of a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the first cancer genome that has ever been fully sequenced and analyzed. Further, Dr. Ding led the analysis of several cancer metastasis/relapse studies including the genome remodeling of a basal-like breast cancer and the clonal evolution of relapsed AML. Dr. Ding's research focuses on identifying and characterizing somatic/germline genetic changes relevant to cancer initiation and progression as well as drug response by integrating various data types including DNA, RNA, and proteomics data. Dr. Ding is also interested in developing algorithms to facilitate the translation of genomic findings to clinical practice.

Dr. Ding leads the Medical Genomics group, consisting of biologists, bioinformaticians, mathematicians, and statisticians. Dr. Ding's team has developed a suite of variant detection and interpretation tools including VarScan, SomaticSniper, CMDS, BreakDancer, BreakFusion, PathScan, and MuSiC; many of them are widely used by the research community and have been applied in several large-scale projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project and the Pediatric Cancer Genome Project (PCGP).

Dr. Ding received a B.S. degree from Fudan University, a Ph.D. from the University of Utah under Dr. Stephen Prescott's guidance, and did her postdoctoral research in the Biochemistry Department at Stanford University. Prior to her move to St. Louis, Dr. Ding was at Incyte Genomics, where she used in silico approaches to discover novel drugable genes and identify gene expression changes during development and disease progression.

Elaine MardisDr. Mardis joined the Genome Institute in 1993. As Director of Technology Development she has helped create methods and automation ...

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... pipelines for sequencing the human genome. She currently orchestrates the institute's efforts to explore next generation and third generation sequencing technologies and transition them into production sequencing capabilities.

Dr. Mardis has research interests in the application of DNA sequencing to characterize cancer genomes. She also is interested in facilitating the translation of basic science discoveries about human disease into the clinical setting.

Dr. Mardis serves on several NIH study sections, is an editorial board member of Genome Research and acts as a reviewer for Nature *and *Genome Research. She serves as chair of the Basic and Translational Sciences Committee for the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group, a National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative group. She serves on the scientific advisory boards of Pacific Biosciences, Inc. and Edge Biosciences, Inc. In 2010 Dr. Mardis received the Scripps Translational Research award for her work on cancer genomics and was named a Distinguished Alumni of the University of Oklahoma College of Arts and Sciences for 2011.

Dr. Mardis is also Professor in the Department of Genetics, with an adjunct appointment in the Department of Molecular Microbiology. Prior to joining the Washington University faculty, she was a senior research scientist at Bio-Rad Laboratories in Hercules, CA. Dr. Mardis received her B.S. degree (Zoology with Highest Honors, 1984) and her Ph.D. (Chemistry and Biochemistry, 1989) from the University of Oklahoma.

Robert FultonAs the group leader of finishing at the Genome Institute, Robert's focus is the improvement of DNA sequence. The high-throughput sequencing ...

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... pipeline is able to produce amazing quantities of sequence data through a highly automated production pipeline, but unfortunately due to the complex nature of DNA sequencing, the resulting product across all regions of genomes is not well represented in all cases. The process of resolving ambiguities, closing gaps, and improving quality of these initial assemblies is his focus. With budgets being tight, and production throughput being so robust and diverse, speed, flexibility, and efficiency of methods are critical. Improvement work can be performed on whole genomes consisting of billions of base pairs to clone based activities as small as thousands of base pairs. Efforts for improvement of these procedures span many aspects of the sequencing pipeline, including sequencing chemistry and assembly algorithm improvements, as well as automated assembly manipulation and reaction selection programs. These improvements have come through close interaction between many groups at the Genome Institute including technical development, production and informatics, as well as outside collaborations with many different groups. These higher throughput mechanisms have been developed in support of manual improvements on some genomes, which require strict quality standards, while also being applied to genomes as a mechanism of high throughput improvement where minimal manual efforts are called for. In either case, the sequence improvement pipeline provides downstream users with a more complete, higher quality product, enabling them to glean as much useful information out of the sequence data as possible.

 

NOT PICTURED

Rob Knight
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
University of Colorado
Boulder, CO, USA
Hot Papers: 14
Field: Bioinformatics

Keith T. Flaherty
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, MA, USA
Hot Papers: 11
Field: Oncology


Based on number of Hot Papers
Source: Thomson Reuters Web of Science®

The data and citation records included in this report are from Thomson Reuters Web of ScienceTM. Web of ScienceTM is a registered trademark of Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.