Hot Paper in Medicine

February 2015
“Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011-2012” by C.L. Ogden, M.D. Carroll, B.K. Kit, K.M. Flegal, JAMA-Journal of the American Medical Association, 311(8): 806-14, 26 February 2014.

Abstract: “IMPORTANCE More than one-third of adults and 17% of youth in the United States are obese, although the prevalence remained stable between 2003-2004 and 2009-2010 OBJECTIVE To provide the most recent national estimates of childhood obesity, analyze trends in childhood obesity between 2003 and 2012, and provide detail. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Weight and height or recumbent length were measured in 9120 participants in the 2011-2012 nationally representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES In infants and toddlers from birth to 2 years, high weight for recumbent length was defined as weight for length at or above the 95th percentile of the sex-specific Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) growth charts. In children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years, obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile of the sex-specific CDC BMI-for-age growth charts. In adults, obesity was defined as a BMI greater than or equal to 30. Analyses of trends in high weight for recumbent length or obesity prevalence were conducted overall and separately by age across 5 periods (2003-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008, 2009-2010, and 2011-2012). RESULTS In 2011-2012, 8.1% (95% CI, 5.8%-11.1%) of infants and toddlers had high weight for recumbent length, and 16.9% (95% CI, 14.9%-19.2%) of 2- to 19-year-olds and 34.9% (95% CI, 32.0%-37.9%) of adults (age-adjusted) aged 20 years or older were obese. Overall, there was no significant change from 2003-2004 through 2011-2012 in high weight for recumbent length among infants and toddlers, obesity in 2- to 19-year-olds, or obesity in adults. Tests for an interaction between survey period and age found an interaction in children (P=.03) and women (P=.02). There was a significant decrease in obesity among 2- to 5-year-old children (from 13.9% to 8.4%; P=.03) and a significant increase in obesity among women aged 60 years and older (from 31.5% to 38.1%; P=.006).  CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Overall, there have been no significant changes in obesity prevalence in youth or adults between 2003-2004 and 2011-2012. Obesity prevalence remains high and thus it is important to continue surveillance.”
 

This 2014 report from JAMA was cited 42 times in current journal articles indexed by Thomson Reuters during September-October 2014. With that two-month citation tally, this is currently the second-most-cited Medicine paper published in the last two years, excluding reviews. Prior to the most recent bimonthly count, citations have accrued as follows, as tracked by Essential Science Indicators Hot Papers:

July-August 2014: 21 citations
May-June 2014: 13
March-April 2014: 2
January-February 2014: 2

Total citations to date: 80

 

SOURCE: Thomson Reuters Web of Science

The data and citation records included in this report are from Thomson Reuters Web of ScienceTM. Web of ScienceTM is a registered trademark of Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.